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Old 12-01-2004, 08:28 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Basic concept. Just write a paper for school? Post it here. Others can feel free to constructively criticize (proofread) the paper in hopes to boulster their fellow Nubblite's grade. Or maybe you're bored and wouldn't mind learning what the Monks in India do during Christmas. Or maybe you just realized you have a ten-page paper on the history of the world due in 10 minutes, and you just remembered that Johnny Sexpants posted a paper of the exact length and subject not too long ago, and you're up for a little plagerism. Or maybe you don't give a fuck and will never click on this thread again, either way, cheers.

***********

Disclaimer: I realize this paper is a pretty poor effort. I put little time into it, and was just going for the bare-minimum. Don't bother correcting my mistakes (not that I expect you to care that much), because I certainly don't care either.

This is a six-page paper required for my CJC 331 "Police Systems" Course.

The 911 Emergency System and the Police-Related Jobs Executing Its Purpose

At 2:00 pm on Friday February 16th, 1968; the first-ever 911 call is placed. Alabama Speaker of the House Rankin Fite called from the Haleyville City Hall to US Representative Tom Bevill at the city’s police station. Bevill answered the phone “hello”, the two exchanged greetings, hung up, and went out for coffee and donuts. A celebration of the first 911 system implemented in an American town was underway (Fitzgerald). It took until 1999 for 911 to officially become the designated nationwide emergency number when President Bill Clinton penned Senate Bill 800 making it so (Bellis). The ability to dial a simple three-digit code anytime you have an emergency, anywhere you have an emergency, has saved countless lives due to the fast emergency responses generated with the 911 system. Today, the technology has become so progressive that satellites and antennas have gotten involved, allowing for pinpoint wireless 911 calls from a cell phone to the proper agency. This paper will deal with several aspects of the 911 emergency system, ranging from the history of its creation and evolution, the enhanced 911 system, and the responsibilities of an oft-forgotten job in policing, the police dispatcher.
In 1876, after dropping battery acid on himself, Alexander Graham Bell uttered these famous words “Mr. Watson, come here. I want you”, and thus was the birth of telephone communication. Several years later in 1937, we see the birth of emergency calling systems. As http://911dispatch.com informs us, it was in 1937 when Britain implemented its “999” emergency calling system. A fire-fatality fire several months back led Britain to creating the emergency number. It is reported that the calls to report the fire were so delayed, that officials became pretty positive that if the calls could have been placed faster, all five would have survived the fire. Britain’s “999” system was successful on its first try when a woman called in the middle of the night to inform police that her home was being robbed. The suspect was apprehended moments later. Clearly the emergency number system had a bright future ahead of it.
It could be debated that several lives would have been saved if other countries had taken the action that Britain did, and create their own universal emergency phone system. Unfortunately it isn’t until 1958 when the next emergency system is in place in the world; New Zealand’s “111” system. Australia follows three years later with its “000” system. Sadly, it isn’t until 1967 when America finally gets in the mix. President Lyndon Johnson’s Commission on Law Enforcement issues a report suggesting that police departments employ a single number to call for help, and that eventually this number should be used universally nationwide. The Commission compared their idea to the telephone company’s long-distance information number. Later in this same year, firefighter Leonard Kershner, is asked by Congress why he thinks that the United States suffered so many fire deaths compared to other countries, Kershner immediately sited poor response times. A few months later, AT&T officials meet with Federal Communications Commission (FCC) officials to discuss the possible logistics of a universal emergency number system. In January of 1968, after several months of snowballing leading up to this announcement, AT&T announces their designation of 911 as a universal emergency number. Widespread speculation follows this announcement as to why AT&T selected “911” as the designated emergency number. The selection was allegedly based on a few factors; the ease of dialing two ones on a rotary phone, some technical switching considerations, and Britain’s precedence with a three-digit number. After reading about AT&T’s announcement the next day, Bob Gallagher, president of the Alabama Telephone Co., decides to beat AT&T to the punch, and implement “911” first. This leads us to the point of the first 911 call detailed in the first paragraph of this paper, and the rest, as they say, is history. On a local note, in March of 1968, AT&T implemented their first 911 system in Huntington Indiana. AT&T chose Huntington because it was the hometown of US Rep Edward Roush who sponsored the adoption of a three-digit emergency number in Congress. It is estimated that by 1993, 911 is available to the great majority of households in the United States.
Today, nearly 140 million Americans are subscribed to a cell phone service (Gaudin). E911, short for Enhanced 911, is an initiative that was taken by the FCC in 1996 (E911). When a person places a call on a regular ground wire, the call is directed to the nearest Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) where the caller’s exact location appears on screen instantly. The cell phone phenomenon introduces a whole new dilemma, how can someone roaming around the country call 911 on their cell phone? Enhanced 911 is the answer. In 1996, the FCC ruled that a 911 call placed from a cell phone must go directly to the nearest PSAP without needing verification of service from a cell phone service provider. This means that even an old cell phone which is no longer serviced by a cell phone provider can still place a 911 call from anywhere in this country. This has directly resulted in the popularity of donating old cell phone’s to charities so un-serviced cell phones can be donated to the less fortunate for emergency calls only. The FCC formally introduced E911 in two phases. Phase I (in 1998) forced mobile phone carriers to disclose the location of the tower from which the signal is being sent to on a cell-phone 911 call. It also demanded that the mobile providers must disclose the number from which the call is being placed. In 2001, Phase II went into effect. Phase II requires that any mobile phone company doing business in the US must provide the exact location, down to the nearest 100 meters from where the 911 caller is located. This is known as Automatic Location Identification. In June of 2003, Senators Conrad Burns and Hillary Clinton introduced the “Enhanced 911 Emergency Communications Act of 2003” (911 Information). The purpose of this bill was to integrate the growing need for Homeland Security with E911. The bill provided money to improve the speed of information coming in from a cell phone call during an emergency. Granting $500 million in tax dollars towards the improvement of 911 infrastructures, our emergency systems today are certainly in better shape than they were pre-September 11th. Senator Clinton says she hopes the bill “[will elevate] emergency communications issues within all branches of government at the federal, state, and local levels” (E911 Caucus).
So now the highly-advanced 911 system is in place. A state of the art telephone and computer system that can do so much except; perform CPR, talk down a suicide candidate, extinguish a house fire, intervene in a domestic dilemma, well you get the idea. This is where the police (along with paramedics and firefighters, but we will be focusing primarily on police) come into play. One aspect of policing that receives less attention than it deserves is the job of the police dispatcher. A dispatcher’s job is to schedule and dispatch workers, equipment, or service vehicles in a speedy fashion as 911 calls come in. In some areas where technology has not advanced terribly far, the speed of the dispatcher’s job performance can literally be the difference between someone living and someone dying. In other more advanced areas, the dispatcher’s duties and responsibilities have been lessened by the automated nature of the 911 system. (Dispatchers – Nature of the Work). Dispatchers are almost always the first person the public is in contact with during an emergency. The dispatcher is the one job that ties the police, EMS, and fire departments in a community together. Citizens dial 911 for an array of emergencies, and although the nature of the emergency dictates which one of the three civil units will handle the emergency, the dispatcher will be taking the calls for all of them. When handling 911 calls, dispatchers question each caller to determine the nature, seriousness, and location of the emergency. In the past, this information was recorded by hand. That practice is nearly extinct now, as we see most emergency information being processed into a computer. In some areas, this information goes through a middle man, a police supervisor. The supervisor’s job is to determine the priority of the emergency, the number of units that will be needed at the emergency, and the precinct from which to dispatch the units (which isn’t a concern in rural communities). In 2002, there were about 85,000 people (mostly in urban areas) employed as emergency dispatchers in America (Dispatchers – Nature of the Work). The US Department of Labor expects job opportunities to grow rapidly in the next few years for dispatchers. “The growing and aging population will increase demand for emergency services and stimulate employment growth of police, fire, and ambulance dispatchers” (Dispatchers – Nature of the Work). Not much thought is given to the fact that the entire concept of policing is hinged on the job of the dispatcher. Sure, on occasion a patrol officer will randomly bump into a situation that needs policing. But the fact is, a great deal of a police officer’s job is derived from responding to the dispatcher’s instructions to respond to a 911 (or non-emergency) call.
In most police systems, a newly hired dispatcher is placed in a new employee in-service program. This is followed by a departmental training program which includes classroom and operational training (McLarty). The responsibility on the hands of a dispatcher is great. In some cases, human lives lie solely in the dispatcher’s ability to communicate clearly with the emergency caller. High context communication is just one quality that police supervisors are looking for in potential dispatcher candidates. An employment notice was recently posted by the San Antonio Texas police department, who is seeking to hire a full time dispatcher. As far as basic requirements are concerned, a simple high school equivalent along with a Texas driver’s license will be enough to get your foot in the door (Dispatcher Employment Notice). However, the depth of skills required for a dispatcher job eliminates a lot of people from contention, and rightly so due to the high level of responsibility associated with the job. There is usually a speed typing quota for a dispatcher job, but surprisingly it can be as low as just 35 words per minute (Finding and Hiring Dispatchers). A clause that seemingly eliminates any outsiders from the job is the need for knowledge of the geographical area. Assuming one does not live in San Antonio (about 99.7% of the people in the US), this would put a huge dent in your chances of being hired as a dispatcher in San Antonio. Two other skills that can be easily taught are the ability to operate telecommunications equipment, and the capacity to determine the seriousness and type of calls. Police executives weed out dispatcher candidates through a series of interviews and tests to see who can stay calm during emergency situations, and who displays the potential to lose control in such a situation. The high-context communication desired for the job includes the ability to effectively communicate clearly with a wide array of individuals utilizing delicacy and diplomacy. The final thing sought out by police supervisors is a “people person”. A dispatcher needs to be able to maintain effective relationships with 911 callers, fellow dispatchers, the officials they are dispatching calls to, as well as the general public. All of these qualities are expected at the low rate of $9-$13 dollars per hour, which is the standard for most dispatchers in America. It is hard to find good dispatchers, when other private-dispatcher jobs in the private sector (such as a cable-service, gas-company, or trucking-business) are able to pay much more, and include better benefits than government dispatcher jobs. This high pressure, high social, “gatekeeper” job is not for everyone as it is the biggest variable in the success of any 911 emergency system.



Works Cited

Fitzgerald, Reba. "Where 911 Began." 30 Oct 2002. The History of 911.
<http://www.911dispatch.com/911_file/...story.html>.
Bellis, Mary. "Who Designed And Installed The First 911 System." 1998. The History of 911
Emergency Calls. <http://inventors.about.com/library/i.../bl911.htm>.
Gaudin, Sharon. "Cell Phone Facts and Statistics." 02 Sept. 2004. Network World.
<http://www.nwfusion.com/research/200...tside.html>.
"E911." 01 Oct 2001. The Webopedia. <http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/E/E911.html>.
"911 Information." 02 2003. Dispatch Monthly.
<http://www.911dispatch.com/911_file/911explain.html>.
"E911 Caucus." 27 2004. Senators Clinton and Burns Introduce E9-1-1 Legislation. House.Gov.
<http://www.house.gov/shimkus/911home.htm>.
"Dispatchers - Nature of the Work." 21 2004. US Department of Labor.
<http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos138.htm>.
McLarty, Nicholas. "Police Dispatcher Training." Northside ISD Police. 16 08 2004
<http://www.nisd.net/police/recruitin...aining.htm>.
"Dispatcher Employment Notice." 30 Oct 2004. San Antonio Police Department.
<http://www.nisd.net/hr/jobs/jobs_pdf...804015.pdf>.
"Finding And Hiring Dispatchers." 14 2003. Dispatch Monthly.
<http://www.911dispatch.com/job_file/...iring.html>.

-Ugly Bastard

[ December 01, 2004, 05:35 PM: Message edited by: Ugly Bastard ]
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Old 12-01-2004, 08:54 PM   #2 (permalink)
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If I get any spare time i'll review this shit and send it to you via email

[ December 01, 2004, 05:57 PM: Message edited by: Mr. Blonde ]

Psychedelics are illegal not because a loving government is concerned that you may jump out of a third story window. Psychedelics are illegal because they dissolve opinion structures and culturally laid down models of behavior and information processing.

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Old 12-01-2004, 09:54 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Woohoo, children's lit paper
EDCI 311
November 12 2004

Aesthetics and Aliens: Laurence Yep’s Influence on Children’s Literature

Laurence Yep is one of the most renowned children’s science fiction authors in the world. His stories have delighted and entertained children since his first book, Sweetwater, debuted in 1973. Laurence Yep creates an identity for himself and for his readers through his writing. This paper will cover some of the works and style of Laurence Yep, as well as talk about major children’s literature issues. These issues include the role of creativity in children’s literature, what a children’s author should have the freedom to write, and whether children’s authors are obliged to touch on the positive and negative aspects of humanity.
Laurence Yep was born in San Francisco on June 14, 1948 (“Laurence” 1). Yep had a very diverse childhood. Raised in an African American neighborhood, Yep attended a bilingual school in Chinatown, a division of San Francisco (“Laurence” 6). Yep learned elements of both Chinese and American culture, and his family “juggled elements of both” (“Laurence” 6). Yep had a difficult time finding his place in the world. He didn’t speak Chinese, which made him feel like an outcast in Chinatown, and all his other friends could only see him for his skin color (“Laurence” 6). “I was the all-purpose Asian. When [my friends and I] played war, I was the Japanese who got killed; then, when the Korean war came along, I was a North Korean Communist” (“Laurence” 6). In high school, Yep discovered science fiction, and was a published author by eighteen (“Laurence” 6). Writing finally provided an opportunity for Yep to discover a cultural identity of his own. As Yep himself even once said: “In a sense I have no culture to call my own since I exist peripherally in several. However, in my writing I can create my own” (“Laurence” 6). Yep went on to earn a bachelor’s at Marquette and the University of California before earning his PhD at the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1975 (“Laurence” 6). He wrote his first book, Sweetwater, while at SUNY Buffalo in 1973 (“Laurence” 7). Since then, he has written more than 45 books for children, 3 books for adults, several plays, and has been included in many compilations and anthologies (“Laurence” 2-5).
One major point of importance in multicultural writing is the preservation of authenticity. Authenticity is a major concern in everything from cultural representation to the continuation of orality. Authenticity is the idea of a genuineness of what an author is writing. Every culture has its trials and tribulations that can only rightly be talked or written about by those who experienced those struggles, the members of that culture. Anglo-Americans can’t authentically write about the struggles of the African American equal rights movement. In the same way, a Catholic should not write about the discrimination he felt from being Jewish. Authors should write what they know. Laurence Yep knew the plight of the Chinese-American trying to adjust to his new home, and that is what he writes about. He knows what it is like to be the outsider, desperately trying to find his way in. “Probably the reason why much of my writing has found its way to a teenage audience is that I'm always pursuing the theme of being an outsider — an alien — and many teenagers feel they're aliens. All of my books have dealt with the outsider” (Authors). While Yep’s books usually deal with being a cultural outsider, they provide help for every person, because we all feel like outsiders sometimes. In a world where everyone’s so concerned with why everyone else is different, Yep is more inclined to point out how deep down, everyone is the same. We all have our own problems. We all have our own goals and dreams. Who we are goes beyond the color of our skin and where we are from. While that may all sound like a 1980’s after school special, it’s the truth.
Yep also seeks to bring to life those Chinese immigrants who came to America in the 20th century.
“Of the hundreds of thousands of Chinese who flocked to these shores we know next to nothing. They remain a dull, faceless mass: statistical fodder to be fed to the sociologists, or lifeless abstractions to be manipulated by historians. And yet these Chinese were human beings—with fears and hopes, joys and sorrows like the rest of us (Dragonwings 316).
He wants others to realize the profound impact they had on this country, and to break down the stereotypes that White America has set forth.
“At the same time, it has been my aim to counter various stereotypes as presented in the media. Dr. Fu Manchu and his yellow hordes, Charlie Chan and his fortune-cookie wisdom, the laundrymen and cooks of the movie and television Westerns, and the houseboys of various comedies present an image of Chinese not as they really are but as they exist in the minds of White America. I wanted to show that Chinese-Americans are human beings who upon whom America has had a unique effect (Dragonwings 317).
While Yep seeks to deal with the idea of the outsider and Chinese culture, that does not mean he has just written historical non-fiction or historical-fiction about Chinese immigrants. Eventually, anyone would get sick of reading about that. No, Laurence Yep has always made sure to stay creative in his writing.
Creativity is one of the most important aspects of literature. Without creativity, all literature would be non-fiction. Every book would just be an account of what had happened, exactly as it happened. Without creativity, Laurence Yep’s only book would be his experiences growing up as a Chinese-American in San Francisco. It would be more like a biography or a set of diaries than a story. Then that would be it for Laurence Yep, as anything else would require imagination, which would mean creativity, which is nonexistent. Luckily, there is creativity, and creativity allows literature to do countless numbers of things. Laurence Yep has been able to write many different types of books. He has covered everything from Science Fiction like “Sweetwater” to historical fiction like “Dragonwings” to mysteries like his “Chinatown mystery” series. Creativity allows authors to write about the same themes and take completely different takes and ideas on them. Creativity would even allow an author to go so far as to cover the same basic themes but still write an infinite number of books by changing the plot, the setting, or any other number of factors in the story. To sum up, creativity is the most important factor in literature because without creativity, literature only exists at its most basic. Sometimes, however, authors are accused of taking too much creative license with their work, and overstepping their bounds.
So how much freedom should an author have when writing for young people? Lying at the root of this problem, it seems to me, is the idea of censorship, and any topic involving censorship is always quite controversial. Should authors be allowed to write whatever they want, even if the book they are writing is aimed at children? The answer is that authors should be allowed to write whatever they want, regardless of who it is aimed at. In a world that strives for the status quo and political correctness, one must remember that the written word is an art, just like drawing, painting, or sculpture. The moment anyone says, “I wouldn’t read that, and neither should you!” is just another step towards a fascist society. The idea of banning a book is ludicrous. If an author wants to write a children’s book about the downfall of a drug addict and in that book, also graphically describes that addict’s sexual experiences, that author has a God-given right to write that book.
What a children’s author can and cannot write for a children’s book is not mandated by the author. A children’s literary canon and the aesthetics that exist in those books are not determined by the author. Any book that is supposed to be for a child that is not very “child-like” will never be published, and even if it was, would never be accepted by the literary community. However, to say that an author should not have the freedom to write what they want is the purest form of censorship and censorship is wrong. Should Laurence Yep not have been able to write his books because they dealt with discrimination and that made a child feel bad? Should Robert Cormier not be allowed to write because he fights the system and rights endings to his books that are realistic, even if they are depressing? The answer to both of these questions is a stern no, but people fight to have them banned all the same. A quote from S. G. Tallentyre (a friend of Voltaire) holds just as true today as when it was written so long ago: “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it” (Quoteland).
The final issue is the idea of whether authors are responsible for presenting both the positive and negative aspects of humanity in there stories. While I will defend the author’s right to write about whatever they want, I do believe it creates in children an unhealthy and overly simplistic view of the world when they are fed nothing but “happily-ever-after” stories. Any life, including a child’s, does not always go like a Disney movie. You’re not always going to make the game-winning shot, get the girl, or miraculously snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. However, some people are convinced this is the only way children’s literature should be. As Donald Gallo reported of a high school social studies teacher’s comment: “The endings of The Chocolate War and I am the Cheese have depressed me to such an extent of that I will not read another book by [Robert Cormier…] unless I read the ending first so that I will know if it’s safe emotionally” (Murrill 357). Now, in my opinion, you are more “safe emotionally” if you mix in some depressing aspects in your reading from time to time. Certainly reading only depressing literature is not good for the human psyche, but reading only happy literature is just as bad. There is certainly danger in getting knocked down by depressing literature too much, but getting built up to such a high point by only happy literature and then having that all crash down is much worse. How does the child react when something doesn’t go there way? Well, I would argue that an overly happy child has no idea how to deal with it. He kind of just freaks out: This is not supposed to happen. This is not how I wanted things to go. The child who read some of those negative books and as Karina Worlton would say “would tend to have a negative attitude” (Murrill 357), can deal with this situation, and knows there is hope for the future. Positive and negative aspects of humanity are presented in every other facet of a child’s life. Why does literature have to be only upbeat and happy? In history, wars, famines, and the Holocaust are not avoided just because they are depressing. No, people would say that is unrealistic, but then you get to literature and any book with a negative ending is public enemy number one. It’s a double-standard that needs to be fixed.
Laurence Yep never had a culture of his own as a child except for the ones he created for himself in his writing. Yep kept his stories creative while still teaching themes of acceptance and the elimination of the outsider. Yep is not afraid to include what he wants in his books, even if some don’t agree with what he says. Finally, Laurence Yep is able to create stories that let the reader deal with both the positives and negatives of this world, and thus provide the reader with a more realistic outlook on the world. Laurence Yep is an irreplaceable piece of the children’s literary canon.
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Old 12-12-2004, 08:04 PM   #4 (permalink)
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The Ethics of California's Three Strikes Law

Twenty-five years to life in prison for stealing a bottle of shampoo? It happened to Ronnie Villa, grandfather of four. William Anderson received twenty-five to life for possessing a forged driver’s license. Michael Morgan is currently in prison for the rest of his life because he stole a bicycle from an open garage while intoxicated (Braz). What do these three people have in common? They all live in California and they are all repeat convicts. Welcome to the zany world of California’s three-strikes law. The law went into effect in March of 1994. The first two “strikes” for any felon must be a serious felony, but the third strike that sends them away for life can be any felony in the book, including a petty shoplifting offense. Obviously, this law was created to cut down on the number of repeat offenses that are seen in California. Yet by creating this law, is California crossing the line of justifiable sentencing? Sending a grandfather of four to prison for life after stealing a bottle of shampoo seems inhumane, whether that same grandfather was involved in a couple armed robberies in his youth or not. Yet even the Supreme Court of the United States upheld the three-strikes law with a vote of 5-4 in 2003 (Lane). The law also doubles the prison sentence of all second strike offenses. No doubt the stiffest and perhaps most inhumane sentencing law in the nation, California’s three-strikes law has undergone a magnitude of criticism. This paper will weigh the ethical issues involved in California’s three-strikes law.
Since implementing the three-strikes law, California’s crime rate has gone down 32.7% compared to just 13.1% for the rest of the nation (Reynolds). This statistic cannot be ignored. The fear of being caught and punished with a long prison sentence has deterred several criminals from committing repeat felonies. Reynolds himself reports on his pro-three strikes website that New York state has bested California during this stretch of time with a 33.4% reduction in crime. New York accomplished this by adding 34,000 new policing jobs throughout the state, not by compromising the ethics of criminal law to brush aside repeat offenders.
Today there are 20,000 three-strikes prisoners in California. In the November 2004 election, all 20,000 were up for a shot to go free (Reynolds). If voted for, Proposition 66 on the California ballot would call for the remedy of the three-strikes sentencing guidelines. The liberal voters of California could not ignore the fact that the law has reduced crime greatly in their state, and issued a conservative “no” in regards to amending the law. The twenty thousand prisoners who still sit in prison today after Proposition 66 was shot down know that over 600,000 more people voted against the proposition than for it (Reynolds). Critics of Proposition 66 feared that California’s crime rate would return to its ultra-high rate in the early 90s if the three-strikes law was tossed out the window. The reversal of crime rate is not a guaranteed if the three-strikes law were dropped. Twenty-four states have had greater reductions in crime than California in the past ten years, none of these states have anything similar to a three-strikes law (Sperling). The ethical doctrine in criminal law that “the punishment should fit the crime” is again and again overlooked in this case. When being mindful of prior crimes committed during sentencing, is California not participating in an obscure form of double-jeopardy? These criminals who are going to prison for life after stealing a cookie were told that they “paid their debt to society” after their last crime. Now those prior crimes are being brought out of the woodwork again, and used to lock up the gate forever on these individuals. Of course, it is easy to look at all the “cookie theft” and “shampoo ordeal” crimes to make a sad case against the three-strikes rule. Let’s take a look at the other side.
A man in his forties brutally rapes a young college girl after sneaking into her dorm and waiting for her to return from class. The man was convicted at the age of 22 for rape, and due to convincing mitigating circumstances, got off with just 4 years in prison. Later, at the age of 29, he rapes again, this time is sentenced to a much harsher, yet still mild, 9 years in prison. Now, at 41, he brutally rapes a young girl. In previous California law, this man might spend as little as another 15 years in prison for his third offense. Is this fair? Perhaps it is. But in March of 1994, California’s third-strikes law decided that it isn’t fair to give this man a hope of seeing the light of day again. Now, this same 41 year old man will be spending the rest of his life in prison. This case is a simple example of where the three-strikes law shines. A serial rapist sentenced to life in prison once and for all. Justice is served! Yet in their haze to lower crime rates, California forgot about all the Michael Morgans and the Ronnie Villas and the Willie Andersons. The oddball cases where harmless rehabilitated criminals have a moment of stupidity, commit a crime that normally would result in a couple months probation, but instead find themselves in prison for the rest of their lives, detached from their families and friends over a stupid bottle of shampoo.
An ethical issue of this variety makes it easy to not care. That is why Proposition 66 was shot down. Why should the people of California care what happens to criminals on trial for the third time in their life. They are dangerous to society, and they should be locked up for good. To the lawmakers and law-abiding voters in California, it is easy to implement the three-strikes law. After all, it is just going to make their lives better. The vast majority of people in California have zero criminal convictions, let alone two, so why be worried about how the three-strikes law will effect them, except to understand that it is going to reduce crime in their state. It is easy to see how the three-strikes law, as unethical as it is, could be so easily implemented into society. To most middle-class citizens, when a law comes across the desk that is going to lock up repeat offenders for life and reduce crime all over the state, it almost sounds too good to be true. But the three-strikes law comes at a great cost to the people of California.
The three-strikes law costs Californians an extra 4.5-6.5 billion dollars per year (Carroll). The intent of the three-strikes law is, of course, to lock up repeat offenders. This requires the construction and operation of more prisons. Some police and court costs may be saved when repeat offenders are locked up forever, but these savings do not dent into the overwhelming costs of jailing criminals. The three-strikes law casts a very wide net on criminals. All felonies are treated the same, therefore the law’s integrity is compromised. One of the alternatives recently considered by California lawmakers, known as the “Rainey Bill” would polarize the impact of the three-strikes law on felons. The bill calls for serious and violent felons to serve their entire prison sentence without the possibility for early release due to “good time served”, and in exchange from this, criminals with more minor crimes would be allowed to just serve probation rather than do time in prison (Carroll). Isn’t this what the three-strikes law intended to do from the beginning? Keep serious and violent offenders off the streets? Yet, somewhere in the mix, a problem occurred, and citizens participating in petty theft crimes suddenly started being sentenced to life in prison for stealing value-less goods. The Rainey Bill attempts to clean up the mess made by the three-strikes law, and rather than treat all felons the same, group them into two categories, violent and non-violent. This would allow regretful peoples in their 60s who have a sketchy past to be able to live out their life in the presence of their spouses and grandchildren, rather than Big Al and Mad Dog.
“They meant well” is a good phrase to sum up California when they implemented the three-strikes law into their criminal code. In its purest form, the three-strikes law is a novel way to lock up repeat criminals and clean up the crime rates of a region. But when ethics are being compromised by sending former armed robbers, turned petty shoplifters to prison for at least twenty-five years, the three-strikes law is nothing to be proud of. Although the dozens of prisoners serving life sentences under truly saddening circumstances lost a Supreme Court vote by a mere count of one last year, the future is hopeful for these people. The tide is turning on the outlook for the three-strikes law. Eventually, one way or another, it seems like justice is always served in this great country’s law. Surely the unethical practice of the three-strikes law won’t go on forever. Surely someday the word will get out about the unjustifiable outcomes of the three-strikes law. Surely.
Works Cited

Braz, Rose. "The Case Against California's 3 Strikes Law ." SFGate.com. 30 Dec. 1998
<http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...D75158.DTL>.

Lane, Charles . "California's '3-Strikes' Law Upheld." Fairness.com. 06 MAR. 2003 <http://www.fairness.com/resources/on...ce_id=5377>.

Reynolds, Mike . Three Strikes And You're Out: Stop Repeat Offenders. Threestrikes.org. 04 Nov. 2004 <http://www.threestrikes.org/>.

Sperling, Godfrey. Adjusting 'Three Strikes' Law. CSMonitor.com. 08 Jun. 2004 <http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0608/p08s03-comv.html>.

Carroll, Stephen . "Rand.org." California's Three Strikes Law. Rand Research. 30 Aug. 2002 <hhttp://www.rand.org/publications/RB/RB4009/RB4009.word.html>.

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Lemme know if any errors are sticking out in that. I didn't really proofread it.

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Old 12-12-2004, 09:26 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Crito

Plato wrote “Crito” as a dialogue that takes place between Crito and Socrates a few days before Socrates’ death. The conversation between Crito and Socrates concerns a possible escape from prison on Socrates’ part. Crito initially offers the services of the escape, and supplies several reasons and incentives for why Socrates should seek his freedom. To this, Socrates lays out an argument based on Socratic moral theory that forbids him to escape from prison. At the end of the dialogue, both Crito and Socrates agree that to escape is not proper on Socrates’ part, and Socrates spends his remaining days in prison. For this essay, I will be referring to “Socrates and the State,” by Richard Kraut, henceforth “Kraut.” I will use Kraut as a tool to best examine “Crito’s” main argument as well as any sub-arguments that may lie within.
“Crito” opens with bad news for Socrates; the the sacred ship of Athens is to arrive in one day. Socrates is to be executed one day after the ships arrival. When informed of the ships arrival, Socrates tells Crito of his belief that the ship will actually come an extra day later, as this was told to him in a dream. Crito wastes no time in telling Socrates of the true nature of his visit, he informs Socrates of his ability to have him broken out of prison, for a certain price that Crito is willing to pay. In 44c of the passage, Crito expresses his wish to not be viewed by the majority as one who values money over the life of a good friend. Crito also expresses a concern for the life of Socrates’ children in 45c, claiming that by not escaping from prison, Socrates is “betraying [his] sons.” Socrates sees these arguments and agrees to evaluate the situation. In light of these concerns, Socrates lays out a small argument as a precursor to the main argument of the passage. From 47a to 48d, Socrates manages to convince Crito that the opinions of the majority should not be the consideration when making a decision. Crito first agrees that a sound statement “must not value all the opinions of men, but some and not others.” The next logical step is therefore that one should value the good opinions and not the bad ones, and that the good opinions are those of the informed men, such as an athlete should follow the opinions of a doctor rather than the masses; Crito also agrees to these statements. If an athlete does not obey his doctor, his body will be hurt; this too, argues Socrates, is the case with unjust actions. Crito agrees that there is a part of the human being that is concerned with justice that is more valuable than the physical body itself, and that this part can be corrupted should it not obey the opinions of an informed and knowledgeable person. The conclusion of this precursor argument is that Socrates should fully evaluate whether it is just or unjust for him to escape from prison rather than to be concerned with the opinions of the masses, no matter what their power may be. With the decision to evaluate his situation as to whether it is just or unjust to escape from prison, Socrates continues on to offer the main argument of “Crito.”
The main argument, according to Kraut, can be broken up into 6 premises:
1) “One must never treat any city or person unjustly. (49b8)
2) By escaping, Socrates would be destroying Athens, for his part. (50a8-b5)
3) Athens is responsible for the birth and education of Socrates. (50d1-51c1)
4) If some person or city X is responsible for the birth or education of Y, then Y treats X unjustly if Y uses violence against X. (51c2-3)
5) Whoever destroys a city, for his part, uses violence against that city. (supplied)
6) If Socrates escapes, he will be treating Athens unjustly.” (Kraut 50)
Socrates uses premise 1 as the basis for the ensuing argument. If Crito were not to agree that one must never act unjustly, no further argumentation would be fruitful for Socrates. This assumption comes from Socratic morals, and since there is no argumentation for it in “Crito,” it can be assumed that Crito and Socrates have discussed the manner in some previous conversations. Adding the term “city” into this premise was a contribution by Kraut to further enhance the idea that some inanimate objects, such as cities, can also be treated unjustly. Socrates makes a firm emphasis of this when he later personifies the Laws by giving them their own voice and argumentation. Without this personification, it would be very difficult to perceive any wrongdoing or injustice to Athens, unless some citizen of Athens was actually harmed.
I believe that Kraut left out a key argument, or perhaps felt that it was inherent in the statement “By escaping, Socrates would be destroying Athens, for his part.” It is not clear how Socrates would be destroying Athens, without first examining all of Socrates’ reasoning for such an assumption. The premises that were left out by Kraut would be “When one has come to an agreement that is just with someone, one should fulfill upon it. Otherwise one is attempting to destroy the agreement, and in turn harming the other party, for his part,” and “To escape from prison, Socrates would be cheating upon an agreement he had justly made.” To examine why Socrates would be “destroying Athens,” we must look first at this agreement between Socrates and the Laws. The Laws tell Socrates in 52b-c of a justly made agreement between Socrates and Athens. They discuss his ability to leave the city should the conditions not be pleasing to him. They argue that Socrates “would have not dwelt here most consistently of all the Athenians if the city had not been exceedingly pleasing to [him]. [Socrates has] never left the city, even to see a festival, nor for any other reason people do; [he has] no desire to know another city or other laws; we and our city satisfied [him].” Because of this acceptance of the city of Athens, argue the Laws, Socrates has agreed to be bound by the laws of Athens. “So decisively did you choose us and agree to be a citizen under us,” claim the Laws, showing that Socrates was a willful participant in this agreement, one which was justly made. There is further proof of this acceptance in 52c where Socrates has chosen to have his children in the city of Athens. To oppose the decisions of Athens, claim the Laws, is to have them destroyed on Socrates’ part, as it is to violate an inherent agreement that Socrates was to obey the decisions of the city. Even though these decisions may not have been just in nature, argues Socrates, the agreement to follow these decisions was justly made, and therefore they must be followed. For Socrates to disobey the court’s orders of imprisonment and execution, Socrates will be violating his agreement to obey the commands of Athens because to obey the commands was part of an agreement Socrates made with the city, and this violation represents an effort to destroy the laws as they regard to Socrates. This is especially apparent when the Laws ask if “it is possible for a city not to be destroyed if the verdicts of its courts have no force but are nullified and set at naught by private individuals?” With this in mind, it is easier to see how Kraut comes to the conclusion that by escaping, Socrates would be destroying Athens, for his part.
Premise 3, “Athens is responsible for the birth and education of Socrates,” (50d1-51c1) comes directly from the text and requires very little argumentation for or against. Socrates was born in Athens, lived in Athens, and was educated in Athens. What is interesting about this premise, however, is the connection that it draws between parents and cities. It is the opinion of Kraut, that to Socrates, Athens was much more than merely a place to live. From reading “Crito,” I agree wholly with this opinion. The Laws mention Athens in such ways that draw a tie between being raised in a city and being raised by parents. They point out that Socrates owes his very existence to Athens and was nurtured and educated by Athens in a manner similar to a parent and child. The Laws further elaborate upon this relationship in 51a-b by saying that “your country is to be honored more than your mother, your father and all your ancestors, that it is more to be revered and more sacred, and that it counts for more among the gods and sensible men, that you must worship it, yield to it and placate its anger more than your fathers.” This quote is viewed by some as representing Socrates as having a particularly totalitarian view of government. The quote can easily lead us to believe that Socrates placed a higher value on a city than merely a place where you live and choose to accept the local government; rather the relationship between a citizen and a city is closer to that of a slave and a slave owner. Socrates even directly uses this image when he compares one who escapes prison to “the meanest type of slave [who tries] to run away, contrary to [his] undertakings and [his] agreement to live as a citizen under us.” (52d)
Premise 4, “If some person or city X is responsible for the birth or education of Y, then Y treats X unjustly if Y uses violence against X,” (51c2-3) is where the parent-city connection becomes important. This assumption, one widely held in ancient Greece, asserts that although violence is not always forbidden, violence against one’s parents is strictly forbidden. While this belief was not commonly held about cities, as cities are inanimate objects, Kraut has adjusted his premise to include cities, once again following Socrates’ lead by treating the Laws of Athens as rational and animate objects. The Laws clearly draw similarities between parents and cities in 51e, “We say that the one who disobeys does wrong in three ways, first because in us he disobeys his parents, also those who brought him up, and because, in spite of his agreement, he neither obeys us nor, if we do something wrong, does he try to persuade us to do better.” This passage carries many implications to the argument as a whole. Not only does it combine both Premise 4 and my own assertion of an inherent agreement, but it also asserts a notion that perhaps absolute submission to the Laws of a city without argument is not the only just action, rather an alternative exists. While it’s unclear how the phrase “try to persuade us to do better,” fits into the argument at hand, being whether or not Socrates is to escape, it does provide a counterpoint to any reading of “Crito” that proposes Socrates’ philosophy is one of absolute rule and absolute submission. The notion that a citizen can be expected to attempt to persuade a city of its injustices opens up a whole line of questioning as to whether Socrates believed that this persuasion could also accompany disobeying, and therefore disobeying the laws would not always be unjust. While Kraut believes that Socrates may have proposed leeway for persuasion, I find this belief doubtful considering the end result of Socrates’ death with very little or no protest. Instead I believe that Socrates held a very totalitarian view on government, especially considering that he was willing to give up his life to hold this view.
Premise 5 of Kraut’s layout of Socrates’ argument, “Whoever destroys a city, for his part, uses violence against that city,” is not specifically mentioned in “Crito,” rather it can be implied logically as it is necessary to imply the conclusion of the argument. It is fairly intuitive, and therefore reasonable for Socrates’ to have used it as an implied premise, for this reason it has been added to the argument. With this assumption, and the aforementioned supplied premises, we are ready to follow them logically to see how Socrates arrived at his final conclusion.
Using Premises 2, 3, 4, and 5, we see the following logical train of sequences:
If Socrates escapes, Socrates would be destroying Athens, for his part, and if Socrates destroys Athens for his part, Socrates uses violence against Athens. Therefore if Socrates escapes, Socrates uses violence against Athens. (7)
Athens is responsible for the birth and education of Socrates and if Athens is responsible for the birth and education of Socrates, then Socrates treats Athens unjustly if Socrates uses violence against Athens. Therefore if Socrates uses violence against Athens, then Socrates treats Athens unjustly. (8)
Using the newly created premises (7) and (8) drawn from logical conclusions, we can conclude Premise 6, “If Socrates escapes, Socrates treats Athens unjustly.” With this premise now proven, and also taking into the account of the very first premise to be agreed upon by Crito and Socrates, “One must never treat any city or person unjustly,” we are forced to come to no conclusion other than “Socrates must not escape.” This would be a fine ending of the Crito, should the whole passage be written logically, but strangely enough, even after Socrates has presented enough material to complete a good argument against escaping from prison, he continues for quite a while, personifying the Laws, giving even further reasons for why escape should not be attempted. It is only after this emotional addition to “Crito” that Socrates considers the matter finished, and Crito agrees.
The final arguments provided by the Laws do not follow that of Socrates’ original wisdom to appeal to one who has knowledge; rather they appear to Crito’s original concerns, those of the masses. If Socrates were to leave, he would have nowhere to go. Should Socrates go to Thebes or Megara, which Socrates believes to possess good governments, he will “arrive as an enemy to their government; all who care for their city will look upon [Socrates] with suspicion, as a destroyer of the laws.” (53a-b) The Laws further bring up the issues which Crito had addressed at the beginning of the passage. First, the Laws tell Socrates that his image could be tarnished by escaping prison, that if he were to ever annoy someone, “many disgraceful things will be said about [him].” (53e) The Laws also bring up Socrates’ children, informing Socrates that should Socrates stay in prison his friends will look after them, but should he escape and eventually find eternity in the underworld, his friends may not look after Socrates’ children. These arguments should be of no concern to Socrates, as he has already decided to do what he decides is just, despite what popular opinion may be. Perhaps this emotional rambling is merely for Crito’s sake, to make Crito firmly believe and agree with Socrates’ decision to remain in prison until his eventual execution. Whether or not it is the case, I believe the last part of “Crito” regarding these issues brought up by the Laws to be unnecessary for Socrates’ argument.

Work Cited
Kraut, Richard. Socrates and the State. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton
UP, 1984.
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Old 02-26-2005, 06:44 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I've decided not to put this on the internet until the grading has been decided.

[ February 26, 2005, 03:59 PM: Message edited by: DJ FC ]
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Old 02-26-2005, 07:33 PM   #7 (permalink)
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wow. i didn't read any of those because of the terrible format. if you're going to post a paper, fucking post the link, it's too hard to try to read shit that isn't in obvious paragraphs or forms.

meet me at the corner of 5th and pontiac. and make sure that no one else is with you, if you wish to see them alive again.
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Old 02-27-2005, 03:55 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I would post the last research paper I wrote, But it was about Henry VIII and I didn't give a damn. So it is about the worst paper I have ever written and would be an embarassment to me and a detriment to the intelligence of anyone who reads it. (which probably means my English teacher will think it is the best paper ever since she is an idiot.

I hope you enjoy living on top of the world, when you die knowing you lived your life on your knees.
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Old 02-27-2005, 05:52 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Not as bad as these:
http://www.nubblies.net/cgi-bin/ubb/...=000341#000000
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Old 02-27-2005, 07:16 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I remember holding that historical, delicious paper on pornography in my hands a long long time ago. I wonder where it is now??

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Old 02-27-2005, 07:18 PM   #11 (permalink)
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It was returned to it's owner, who then got in trouble with her parrents so I assume the original has been destroyed.
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Old 02-27-2005, 10:14 PM   #12 (permalink)
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It should have been preserved in a glass case.

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Old 04-19-2005, 01:08 AM   #13 (permalink)
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P366 Philosophy of Action Mid-Term Take Home Examination. 2 Parts Each worth 25% of the Final Grade. Got an A- on Part 1 and an A on Part 2.

Part 1

Part 2

P301 Mediaeval Philosophy Take Home Mid Term, worth 25% of my final grade. A-

Paper
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Old 04-19-2005, 01:11 AM   #14 (permalink)
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What a very odd and interesting topic.

L 250: Final Project
Book XII: 783-799

[roboris Aeneas]. dum nititur acer et instat,
rursus in aurigae faciem mutata Metisci
procurrit fratrique ensem dea Daunia reddit.***** **785
quod Venus audaci nymphae indignata licere
accessit telumque alta ab radice revellit.
olli sublimes armis animisque refecti,
hic gladio fidens, hic acer et arduus hasta,
adsistunt contra certamina Martis anheli.***** 790*********
Iunonem interea rex omnipotentis Olympi
adloquitur fulva pugnas de nube tuentem:
'quae iam finis erit, coniunx? quid denique restat?
indigetem Aenean scis ipsa et scire fateris
deberi caelo fatisque ad sidera tolli.************** 795
quid struis? aut qua spe gelidis in nubibus haeres?
mortalin decuit violari vulnere divum?
aut ensem (quid enim sine te Iuturna valeret?)
ereptum reddi Turno et vim crescere victis?

While he was pursuing and straining, vigilant, the goddess of Daunus, having turned back into Metiscus the charioteer, ran ahead and returned the sword to her brother. Venus, having been indignant that the nymph was permitted to be bold, pulled out the weapon from the deep root. These exalted, with their arms and spirits restored, this one trusting in a sword, this one fierce and tall with a spear, the panting ones stand nearby face to face in the rivalries of war. Meanwhile, the king of omnipotent Olympus addresses Juno, watching the fights from a golden cloud. “What will now be the end, wife? What at last is left? You yourself know, and will admit to know native Aeneas ought to be raised to the stars by heaven and fate. What are you contriving? Or with what hope do you cling to the chilly cloud? Was it proper that a god be violated by a mortal wound? Or for the sword (for truly what could Juturna have been capable of without you?) having been seized, to be returned to Turnus and power to be bestowed upon he having been conquered?”

Perpetuated Pique

As the vigiligant, straining Aeneas pursued,
The goddess of Daunus, assuming the form of Metiscus, changed into the charioteer.
She ran forth and put the sword back into the hands of her brother.
Venus then went forth and pulled Aeneas’s spear from the clutches of the tree,
For she was enraged at the nymph’s audacity.
The exalted ones, panting with arms and airs restored,
This one with a trusty sword,
This one with a tall spear,
Stood by face to face, fighting as rivals in war.
The king of omnipotent Olympus,
Meanwhile, addressed Juno, watching the fight from a golden cloud.
“When will you stop?
What will be left?
Indeed wife, you know, and will admit that you know,
That it is right for Aeneas to ascend to the stars by the heavens and fate.
What are you scheming?
What hope is left clinging in your cold heart?
Was it right to use a mortal wound to harm a god?
Was it right to return power and the sword to the conquered Turnus?
For truly, what could Juturna have done without your interferring?

For this poem, I used an inbetween measure of being liberal with the slow pace of some lines, due to spondees outweighing dactyls slightly overall (45 to 57 by my calculations). I lengthened some lines out, and at the same time, for some shorter or more blunt lines, pinpointed them and made them shorter in my translation to allow a bit of skipping from one line to the next. This also had the effect of making the poem physically longer, but not very long overall. There were some lines that I bisected for certain reasons, like 793, in order to make the points quick and abrupt. But for the most part I tried to make it sound elaborate and drawn out as if I was about to end a long tale, because these events are leading up to Juno finally giving up her grudge.
I made sure to echo as many of the slower lines as I could, such as for 785, I embellished a bit: “She ran forth and put the sword back into the hands of her brother.” I also made sure to pinpoint the two fastest lines, which according to my scanning, were the only two with dactyls outweighing spondees, lines 791 and 793. In order to repeat the small alliteration ending line 784 with mutata Metisci, in my poem I put Metiscus first and ended the sentence with “changed into the charioteer.” I also used alliterations from 788 and 790. Line 791 also had a small alliteration, and I think that worked out well along with making 791 and 793 abrupt. And after finding so many little alliterations, I made one for my title.
Since line 789 was equal in spondees and dactyls, I decided to use my artistic right and make them a little quicker and shorter in order to presuppose the two quick lines (791 and 793) that follow, and in order to highlight the anaphora caused by the two “hics.” I also separated the two halves into separate lines because I felt it helped to call attention to this. I didn’t find a whole lot of metaphors and similes, except for line 791 where I singled out “The king of omnipotent Olympus” as it’s own line which helped bring out the fact that it’s an implied comparison.
Also, I didn’t find much in the way of personifications or polysendetons, which I had expected to find because they seem to be at least somewhat common. I thought there might be a bit of personification in “chilly cloud,” used as a transferred epithet to kind of reflect Juno’s demeanor. I thought that may be the case anyway since it seemed more appropriate to comment on Juno being cold than the cloud. I did pull out an asyndeton from 789, since I’m pretty sure the “et” was used to describe “fierce and tall” and fails to link the two halves of the line together. I thought I noticed a prolepsis, which I thought was a very interesting concept, in line 797 with “violated by a mortal wound.” But I was interpreting “violated” to mean “harmed” (he would have been harmed by the sword, not the wound, so in that way I saw it as anticipation) but I think Vergil probably just meant he was “shamed” by the wound. Regardless, I pulled something out of that anyway and said “use a mortal wound to harm a god,” using the word “harm” to reflect what I figured was “shame.” So that ended up being kind of interesting anyway. I left the “and” in with heavens and fate in line 795, supposing a possible hendiadys, and I translated lines 797 and 798 similarly to 795 because I liked the added reflexivity. I used that same idea in what I translated for 785 and 787. I also used a zeugma in my translation of 799 because I thought it fit well enough with the Latin. Lastly, I switched the syntax of the last line from how I had it in my grammatical translation. I did this in order to use the example of Juno aiding Juturna to make it clear the fact that Juno is the integral reason that the overall conflict has continued for so long.

I do what the fuck I want.
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Old 04-28-2005, 08:46 PM   #15 (permalink)
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"The cat and the dog will sleep in my room, but the lion will sleep in the basement."

A passage from a paper I'm just finishing up for Italian class, on the topic of 'What I would like to do in my life'.

#YOLO
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Old 09-23-2005, 02:00 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Prof made me write a 100 word (yes... 100 words Max) paper on a topic so large it's still being discussed today... using two of histories most prolific sources, Augustine and Aquinas:

For a war to be just, according to Augustine, three criteria must be met:

1) The war must be started by one who has authority
2) The war must have a just cause; those being attacked must deserve the attack
3) The intentions of those starting the war must be good

Aquinas agrees with these three criteria and quotes Augustine as supporting evidence. Aquinas further enriches the issue by considering fighting between bishops and clerics (which he largely disapproves of), and the use of fighting on holy days and ambushes (both of which he believes can be done in a just manner).


I don't even consider 100 words to be a paper, but more of a sumary, but damn there is a lot of material to go through to get this summary.
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Old 09-27-2005, 04:19 PM   #17 (permalink)
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This is the extent of the writing I do these days:

27 Sep 05

MEMORANDUM FOR ALL UNIT MOBILITY PERSONNEL

FROM: 20 SFS/CC

SUBJECT: Mobility Readiness

1. You all heard the briefings from Maj Burke and Capt Sherman after our last mobility exercise. Readiness is a fact of life in today’s Air Force. I am sending out this letter to reiterate some of the key points from Maj Burke and Capt Sherman’s briefings regarding mobility requirements and the services provided by the legal office.

2. The most important task when preparing to deploy is being aware of the current mobility requirements. The main requirements are to have your dog tags and four forms up to date: DD Form 93, PHS Form 731, AF Form 141, and SGLI Form 8286. The DD Form 93 is your Record of Emergency Data and contains vital contact information should something happen to you while deployed. The next form, PHS Form 731 is your Internal Certificate of Vaccination. This will be used to ensure you have received the proper vaccinations for the environment towards which you are heading. To facilitate payment and verify adequate support for your dependents, make sure your Leave and Earnings Statement, AF Form 141, is current. Probably the most important document to have completed is the SGLI Form 8286; this is your Serviceman’s Life Insurance and designates your beneficiaries should you be killed in the line of duty. Along with life insurance you should have a living will and power of attorney.

3. A living will and power of attorney are just two of the many issues our Legal Affairs office can help you with. A living will requires significant preparation before you deploy, so you should begin making these decisions well in advance. Just as important, and more likely to be necessary, is a power of attorney. This will give a person, appointed by you, the legal ability to manage your estate while gone--from making car and mortgage payments to authorizing medical care of your children. It is recommended that you set an expiration date of one year but you have the ability to revoke this power at any time.

4. I have detailed the major documents you will be required to have ready before deploying and some of the matters our Legal Office can help you with. I am sure that armed with this information, our next readiness drill will not result in a “marginal” rating and you will all be prepared to deploy when the time comes. If you have any questions please contact 2nd Lt Borders at 712-3343.

GERARD J. ROGERS, Lt Col, USAF
Commander, 20 SFS

“This year will go down in history. For the first time, a civilized nation has full gun registration! Our streets will be safer, our police more efficient, and the world will follow our lead into the future!”
-- Adolf Hitler 1935
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Old 10-17-2005, 02:55 PM   #18 (permalink)
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I have yet to write this paper, i'm trying though. It's for my Soc. 421 class, Sociology of Minorities. Someone please tell me this is a fucking joke. Not only is this paper what looks to be vomited up by a highschooler pretending to play teacher, but I have no idea what the fuck she wants from me. Here is the outline:

List ten similarities between the following groups of people.

-Homosexual people and heterosexual people

-Christian people and Jewish people

-Poor people and wealthy people

-Old people and young people

-White people and Asian people

-Fat people and thin people

-Women and men

-People who walk and people who use wheelchairs

Discuss the effects, as they relate to social justice issues, of emphasizing similarities between people rather than differences.


This is fucking retarded.

Psychedelics are illegal not because a loving government is concerned that you may jump out of a third story window. Psychedelics are illegal because they dissolve opinion structures and culturally laid down models of behavior and information processing.

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Old 10-17-2005, 03:11 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Yeah, that looks as though it came from someone's ass.

I enjoy knives and fire.
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